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20121130
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CSPAN2 28
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CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 6:00am EST
. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also killed. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their military response and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international support for israel's position. we wish to see an agreed ceasefire that stops the rocket attacks and ends israeli military operations. efforts are continuing as i speak, and the u.n. security council will continue discussions on the situation today. more open access in and out of gaza is part of any longer-term solution. we pay tri
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
, is the other side of the argument and some of what we have heard during the questioning. certainly, hamas is an organization that has committed atrocities of human life. i have referred and answered to what hamas needs to do and how there is a need for that. >> tomorrow in "washington journal", julie rudner discusses the health care a lot of potential hurdles in state courts. >> amtrak's inspector general said that by improving its invoice process, amtrak has discovered $20 million of overpayment rate the comments came during a hearing on amtrak's reorganization plan. this is a little less than two hours. >> washington worked its way up, and then he went to harvard law school. and then one of his brothers immigrated out west illinois to galena, illinois. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship and stagecoach and trained. and he arrived on steamboat in the smutty mining town. they established a law practice in a log cabin. he became a very successful lawyer in galen. he ran for congress for four terms. then he befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois. and then ulysses s
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 7:00am EST
on the israeli prime minister and all those with contact with hamas to d escalate, stop the fighting, stop the bombing and that is what i have done. over the weekend i spoke twice to the israeli prime minister, wants to the president of israel. my friend the foreign secretary is working on this as well to be -- persuade both sides the need a ceasefire and beyond that we need proper discussion about the future of israel and palestine. >> i agree with the prime minister. he is right to say any cease-fire deal can only be turned into a permanent peace if there are meaningful resumption of negotiations. this week have shown once again there is neither peace nor a peace process. the reality is the international community dumped their responsibility for the abject failure of having meaningful negotiations nine years on from the promise of a road map to peace. what was set out to the past -- beyond the hopes for a cease-fire need to be taken to pressure both sides into meaningful negotiations. >> first of all let me agree that we do need a process to be put in place and we need to do everything w
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 9:00am EST
that hama hamas is defensible response but for the crisis and could end the conflict by stop bombarding israel was hard. does he agree with me that the use of long range imported missiles by hamas capable of striking jerusalem has made this much were difficult to achieve? >> yes, absolutely. it is clear that the armory of rockets in gaza has changed since the time of operation, and although there is a longer range rockets, we seen them launch at tel aviv and at least in one case at jerusalem. of course that is an escalation of the threat to israel. but it only underlines the importance of taking forward all the work on a negotiated piece and settlement in the middle east so which has been supported across the house. >> in august this year in a report that gaza would be unlivable by 2020, 44% of posting in gaza -- [inaudible] what conversation has he had with counterparts recently on increasing basic humanitarian coming into gaza and that continues to increase? >> this is a constant part of discussions with israeli leaders. of course, we put the case for that, and, indeed, more than that
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
between the two countries. hamas distanced himself from damascus and recently a hamas leader was in turkey and he said to prime minister erbe one pitcher not only the leader of turkey, which are the leader of the muslim world, one of the leaders of the muslim world. this goes to show how much iran's access of resistance, which has included hamas is being weakened. now on to sanctions, as you know, sanctions have had disastrous effects on the iranian economy and in large part, this is due to the rainy government's own mismanagement and dysfunction, specifically the ahmadinejad administration handling of the economy. the sanctions have abetted the economic situation or exacerbated it. all the currency has appreciated by 90% in the last year. middle income iranians are hurting. it's hard to put food on the table. entire countries really suffering because of sanctions for most of the the policies and mismanagement. sanctions have raised the cost on iran's nuke you pursue. we often talk about the sanctions haven't been successful, that we haven't seen any signs that iran is to win back the nucl
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
or not the path of pockets of violence to his two state solution. let's be honest, in recent days, hamas in the midst of the conflict with israel welcome the secretary general, prime minister v-chip comforter set turkey, iraq, jordan come the pulse to any authority, saudi arabia and sudan. in a statement today, the foreign secretary briefly lauded president abbas is the greatest man of peace. he genuinely wants to support moderate palestinians in efforts to engage in meaningful negotiations. an extension about further violence or politics secure his legitimacy and results. just eight days ago the foreign secretary sought to this position by telling the recognition the united nations could risk paradise in the process. he spoke again of the process today. when will the foreign secretary understands that there is no process, only paralysis. indeed, can the foreign secretary say what he was today. and a masters continued with a legal settlement building there's been continued attacks. and fighting continued conflict, continued occupation. there's been continued blockade, but no meaningful n
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:15am EST
hamas. to get at the syrian brotherhood which had been targeting regime elements. they are not free or innocent themselves and 20-30,000 people were killed in a couple of days. now it's been more of a -- what i call in the book, machiavellian blood-letting because the regime didn't want this single day or two day or three-day massacre of the city or a chemical -- use of chemical weapon s that would galvanize an international response and compel the international community to respond. so it's been more this piece-by-piece and has to do with the various limitations on the syrian army and the trust tt worthy elements of the syrian army. but i would blame the government most of all for that initial reaction. >> thank you. yes. >> yes, personally don't think we should have gone the middle east in a war for any reason, but bush had to have his war. the russians failed, the british failed. don't you think we started all these clans and these factions -- haven't we stirred them up by starting these things we did? can you comment on that? >> comment on how we can -- >> well, not on -- well,
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
of thousands of others. mudslides caused further damage. hamas, entered and starving, survivors rushed to the coastal area in the news of loved ones. as news reports filter back, president nixon promised 10 bundlers and 10 bundler zenaida solis promising to an army navy helicopters to the search and rest emission. the american public moved by the devastation had begun donating supplies and money to be sent to people in korea. similarly a pathetic, pat wanted to help. during the weekend at camp david a couple discussed the situation with the possibility of delivering donations from the american people down to peru. a week later she flew to peru in the conservative solace, way for the permanent president and l-lima to deliver donations to visit the injured and homeless. she took with her 18,000 pounds of blankets and other goods as well as during her brief stay she accompanied by nature the most devastating regions on a small plane sitting all manner repurposed kitchen chair with no seatbelt. walking amid the rebel she offered comfort to those who had lost everything. her genuine concern
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 12:00am EST
. they argue both hamas, since they make customers pay income taxes to pay interest, the customers are paying twice this income tax. and they've never denied denied this. i've always said is a subtle matter. it's over. be careful to never denied that they pocketed all this money. the second part is the utility companies often have a holding company structure. so you have your local utility for water and natural gas, but it's increasingly owned by companies in spain and france because rules are favorable to make a profit. companies mostly i prefer money. utility makes a profit of 11% after taxes pay the company. makes it dirty%. and those taxes charge at the highest possible rate, in many cases never get to the government. not a ten-year limit the interest of the billion dollars, but the holding company set up a mechanism market the money. when i expose this in 2002 to "the new york times," oregon passed a law that said give it to the government or give it back to the customers. general electric, no problem. northwest natural gas, no problem. one by warren buffett went to the legislature and s
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 8:00pm EST
, the impact that may have not only with regard to hamas, but the area around him, and if he thinks about making compromise, what he sees is the high likelihood this is going to produce a backlash. he gives an interview with channel 2 in israel where he speaks he's personally not going back, and he's burning effigy and administrations against him in gaza, and assumings what the consequences are if he takes those steps. that's a chilling effect on him. also, given what you see with the arab awakening, that's made him, perhaps, not surprising reasons, but act popular. flip side in israel, same thing. you do a deal, and is it going to be durable, you know, what do you face after it, and this is a time where rather than thinking about taking big leaps forward, there's a tend sigh to think about what are the risks, and not what are the opportunities? i would say it's understandable that both sides have the view, and there's also something else. you know, the status quo will not remain static. the demographic clock keeps ticking, and the currents among palestinians says one person, one vote. i
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 6:00am EST
spring, the syria war, and now this confrontation between israel and hamas that somehow kind of brought us back to the middle east that we used the to know the arabs and israelis going at it and egypt being -- [inaudible] but right before that iran saw its fortunes decline, its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation introduced a very, very important element, almost sectarian element, that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this, of course, goes into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons. this is a good time to start negotiating with iran as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, it's not as soft power, superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the renal payoff the situation -- in the region because of the situation in lebanon and syria. p lebanon is really the coming disaster, and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so, of course, all of this will go on. and if i were amer
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 10:30am EST
, and even imprisoning people for selling raw milk, you can go to an amish farmer from some of these hamas farmers have been arrested and threatened with jail because they are selling milk to their neighbors. >> will you be taking these issues nationwide? >> we will be talking about it everywhere anybody will listen because we think government has gotten out of control. government has run amok, and government has become a bully. someone has to stand up to a bully. >> november 2012, post-election. the 2012 elections clarify for you? >> well, that we as republicans need to do something to grow as a party. we are in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we don't figure out what people want out on the west coast, new england, around the great lakes. solid blue. and so we figure out what people want we're not the right to win again as a party. >> what do you think they want. >> i think they are conservative. they think we should balance our budget, but i also think they don't think we should be at war everywhere all the time. the one little more tolerance in policy as far as putting people in prison
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 9:00am EDT
of diplomatic ties to iran. there has been no drastic change in egypt's policy towards the hamas government in gaza, or the border regime between the sinai and the gaza strip. there is a recognition, i think, on the part of the government, of the need to leverage the network of relationships and alliances that egypt has formed over the last three decades to deal with what is a very difficult economic situation, domestically. and i will talk about that a little bit further on. so we see on the level of foreign policy much more consistency and much more durability and any sense of radical change, as was the expectation following the outbreak of the revolution. now, that does not mean that there will be no change. i think what you do see on the part of the new government is a clear determination to reassert egypt's regional role that would seem to have been diminished under the former regime. we have seen a much more activist foreign policy on the part of this president with numerous visits to china, reaching out to europe, a visit to iran in the context of the non-aligned movement in reaching
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 11:00pm EST
, which would have actually indicated their readiness to and things with hamas and that proposal wasn't really pursued. but the fact is it was not pursued. but these two examples are indications that with the right kind of pressures, the behavior will change. as you said, p.j. , there is no doubt that we have succeeded in putting on them sanctions. in 2010 we had to change the dynamic. we got to the point where we were able to work with the rest of the world. the estimates right now are every two months. think about what that means. it means whatever they have in the bank is valued at half as much. the manifestations of this on a society are not hard to come by. we had demonstrations during the most recent ramadan. three weeks ago we had demonstrations again. it was the linchpin of the revolution in 1979. you had the supreme leader for the last two weeks making statements where he says that he describes the sanctions as being in his words, brutal. this is the same gentleman who said sanctions make us stronger. we become more sufficient and we are better off. and suddenly we are talkin
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
that rebellion centered in the city of hamas and killed, according to the claims of the regimes, 38,000 people in a 27-day campaign in the months of february in 1982. the people felt if they back off, they would be punished because in the 80s, after 82, the next following years, they punishedded them collectively, about 80,000 forcibly disappeared people whose files are still not closed, and thousands and thousands of prisoners of conscious. the syrians felt they have to continue at any cost. when help doesn't come, the idea of defense formed in the movement itself, and so those soldiers defecting from the army started creating small groups to defend, in fact, initially what they called the peacefulness of the revolution, and so they went around buildings because that's where snipers used to shoot peaceful protesters, but as an author said, defense is the first act of war. what happened is that in order to achieve this defense of civilians, the small groups, which increasingly also became joined by civilians who took up arms to defend the towns, families, and suburbs, started, actually, engagi
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
that may have no the only with regard to hamas but whole area around him and if he thinks about making compromise, what he sees is the high likelihood this is going to produce a backlash. he gives a, he gives an interview with channel 2 in israel where he speaks that he is personally not going back to -- and see him burning in effigy and demonstrations against him in gas salt he can assume what the consequences are if in fact he takes these kind of steps. so it had a chilling effect on him. also given what you see with the arab awakening it made him perhaps not for surprising reasons act more as a populist. on the flipside within israel. same thing. you're going to do a deal with abu mazen. is it going to be durable? you know, what are you going to face right after it? this is a time where rather thinking about taking big leaps forward there is tendency to sort of think about what are the risks and not what are the opportunities. i would say it's understandable that both side have that view but i would also say something else. you know, the status quo won't remain at that time tick. de
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 11:45pm EST
and book award. thing keogh. from toure this afternoon. [applause] >> carla? >> a chronicle of the hamas stock rebels this it is particularly intriguing because it it is based on letters of the actual rubbles that 10 came across the structure it is of beautiful because he interweaves the letters. sean hill rights always a and ambitious public seven young rewards "the reader" with the latest volume of the book arden see. the kidnapped african who famously rebelled against their chapters to find themselves lending in america that robert haden roach of in middle passage and stevens been bit -- steven spielberg rendered and armas died here in this very important book readers in gauged with a tragedy and drama of this incident their exploration of the small human moment of the rebels' plight. a major american voice has brought this to bear in the book at once eloquent and playful. mrs. navtech of the 19th century event and we should be reading this book allowed. 10 young's bio it is in the program so i will just introduce them. congratulations. [applause] >> icing on top of basing now i can p
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 9:00pm EST
in washington as anacostia what has been written about his later life. estimate the hamas called cedar hills. is it still here? >> actually to read in the early 1970's frederick douglass site opened and the flagship side of the national park service has over 40 or 50,000 visitors every year. its high of on the hill and the u.s. capitol dome for the right it is really an amazing majestic view and it's open seven days a week, and the curator of the douglas contributed forward and this was important to me, too to make this book not just kind of -- to make active living histories of people that read the book if they've never been to the douglass house would say i want to go over there or if they haven't been there for a few years they can go back over and kind of revisit. >> he is the curator of the douglass house. >> he was the curator for many, many years. a very well-respected kind of a douglass community, and then dr. clifford who was the university archivist at the house contributed the foreword. john muller is the author of frederick douglass and washington, d.c. the line of anacostia. tha
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
was killed -- a hamas leader was killed, and the perpetrators were seen. how do you, how do you go off the grid now as a spy? how can you go through? [laughter] just asking for a little trade craft. is that so wrong? >> again, i would underscore the discipline. trade craft is mostly about discipline and paying attention to detail. whether it's a disguise or whether it's the cover story. increasingly, your partners. we tend to think of the spy as this unilateral, solo hero, and there's still some of that, there always will be. but with a growing interdependence and talk about risk, it's increasingly about building alliances and partnerships, trusted partnerships where you can work with other services and other entities around the world. and that's overall a good thing. >> well, you were called by director john mclaughlin a genuine american hero. he is not a man who's given light ri to that kind of -- lightly to that kind of thing, so we thank you for joining us as an american hero and appreciate it. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] >> and we have more from the ideas forum now as lead
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
is because the israeli defense forces are infinitely more professional than the hamas fighters. the number of casualties on the palestinian side are always going to be much greater thereby leaving an impression that there is somehow something unfolded about the war. this is precisely the time when you need the correspondence that have spent the years in the region because by and large you ask me what i think of the coverage i think it's surfaced. it focuses on the obvious. you don't hear much about the underlying causes or with the underlining possiblities made before the agreement between the two sides. i think that is one of the things that we have lost not having resident correspondents who report year after year after year. >> it's interesting just an additional point that a couple of nights ago abc world news tonight happened to be there doing another story when the story erupted and the anchor diane sawyer turned to her with a big introduction to we have her there she is going to give the inside story but then they gave her about 45 seconds to do the inside story, and you could see h
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 9:00am EST
at what happened recently in the conflict from hamas, the missiles that were being shot into israel, and the system to understand the importance of missile defense. that is a system that focuses on short-term -- short-range missiles, but we all saw the number of civilians that could be protected by the capacity of having a robust missile defense system, and i can't imagine why we wouldn't want to be in the position to make sure that the east coast of our country would be as protected as the west coast when it comes to an emerging threat from iran. and there's no question that the more we hear about the behavior of iran, the more troubled we should be as a country, not only are they -- do they have a robust missile development program, but we all know that they are also making efforts to acquire the capability of having a nuclear weapon. and so now is the time for us to act, not to find ourselves in 2015 with no plans as to how to deploy an east coast missile defense site to make sure that the east coast of our country has the same protection as the west coast, and now is the time to
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
with regard to hamas, but the area around him, and if he thinks about making compromise what he says is the high likelihood this is going to produce a backlash. he gives an interview with channel 2 in israel where he speaks that he's personally not going back, and you see him burping effigy and demonstrations against him, and he can assume what the consequences are, if, in fact, he takes these steps. it's a chilling effect on him. also, given what you see with the arab awakening, it's made him, perhaps, not for surprising reasons, act more as a populist. on the flip side, with israel, same thing. you're going to do a deal, is it durable? what are they facing after it? it's a time rather than thinking about taking big leaps forward, there's a tendency to think about what are the risks, and not what are the opportunities? i would say it's understandable that both sides have that view, but i would say something else. you know, the status quo is not static. the demographic clock keeps ticking. the currents among palestinians is one person, one vote. one of the big challenges for the admi
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 11:00pm EST
several years ago when the hamas leader was killed and the perpetrators were seen. how do you go off the grid now as a spy? how can you go through? just asking for little trade plan. is that so wrong? [laughter] >> again, i would underscore the discipline. trade craft is mostly about discipline and paying attention to detail or whether it's a disguise with those cover story. increasingly your partners. we tend to think of the spy as this unilateral hero and there is still some of that and there always will be. but the growing interdependence of an attack about a race, it is increasingly building alliances and partnerships, trusts and partnerships for you can work with other services and other entities around the world. that is overall a good thing. >> when you are called by director john mclaughlin a genuine american hero, he is not a who is given likely to that kind of thing. so we thank you for joining us as an american hero. [applause] >> now, the national urban league hosts a discussion on education and jobs. the penal code which includes the head of the urban league mark morel t
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30pm EST
on this day, so much is now, and they are all, of course, interconnected. hamas is testing israel. israel is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 12:00pm EST
is not easy, that you have palestinian interlocketters. you have, but it's not a done deal because of hamas and things like that, but my hope is that a speech like that would change the political balance within israel. it would make israelis realize that we're going off in a bad direction here. >> can i invite questions from the audience? we have mike here who would like, for the sake of the tv and recordings, to go to the microphone. yeah, i would like the questions from the microphone so it can be picked up, yes. >> my name is paul gallager with eia news service. i want to talk about controlling the war policy and the drone policy of the current obama administration, which completelyignores the congress and the war powers act and the constitution. leaving aside what romney's might do which is bringing about a kind of 9/11 take 2 remitted by the calamity in benghazi and the possibility now of a retaliation, a bombing retaliation to the calamity. al-qaeda is not being defeated by the strategy, but ratter the opposite. the saudis are in the middle of the 9/11 take 2, support from london is i
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30am EST
for hezbollah and hamas and turn it into only political support. unfortunately, that turned into only pursuit. but these two examples are indications that with the right kind of pressures, their behavior will change. now, as you said, p.j., there's no doubt we have succeeded in putting on them crippling sanctions. in 2009 we talked about biting sanctions because we had to change the dynamic. we've gotten to the point where we're able to work with the rest of the world and mobilize the rest of the world to put crippling sanctions on them, and the estimates right now are every two months their currency is being devalued by half. every two months. think about what that means. it means whatever they're buying costs them twice at much, it means whatever they have in the bank is valued at half as much. the manifestations of the effect this is having within society are not hard to come by. you had demonstrations during the most recent ramadan because there was a shortage of chicken. not typical to have demonstrations during ramadan. three weeks ago you had gone straights in the bazaar, again by the
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 12:00pm EST
forces are infinitely more professional than hamas fighters, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are always going to be much greater, thereby leaving an impression that there is somehow something unfair about the war. this is precisely a time when you need the correspondents have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask me what i think of the coverage, i think it's surface. it focuses on the obvious, the casualties. you don't hear much about the underlying causes or what the underlying possibilities may be for agreement between the two sides. i think that's one of the things we have lost in not having resident correspondents who report from a region year after year after year. >> is interesting, just an additional point, ted, a couple of nights ago abc "world news tonight" had -- happened to be there doing another story when the gaza story erupted. and anchor diane sawyer turned to her, with a big intro, that we have chris there and she will give us the inside story. at then they it for about 45 seconds. to do the inside story. and she was, you could see. she
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 2:00am EST
, interconnected. hamas is testing israel. israel is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor because i'm there are a lot of questions swimming in your head. i'd like to propose our panelists talk about the flow of the situation right now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28